10 marketing lessons to improve your career

I think there’s a natural synergy between marketing a brand and personal development through your career – Your personal brand matters. Here are 10 marketing lessons.

Througout the 2018/19 season I’m presenting at a number of universities and entrepenurship lectures across the midlands. With a focus on marketing, I think there’s a natural synergy between marketing a brand and personal development throughout your career – Your personal brand matters.

Below are 10 marketing principles and their application to personal/professional development, aimed specifically at final year marketing students.

Be relevant

1 - relevance of contentProvide useful content

Check your phone. Which app is in the top right corner? Is it relevant? Now, without looking, what time is it? Relevance depends on context.

1 - relevance broad skillsetBroaden your skill-set

Holding a broad skill-set will ensure you can contribute relevant information during a conversation – Be it between colleagues or during an interview.


Learn continuously

2 learn continuously data drivenTrial your strategy

Any good digital marketing strategy utilises a continuous learning strategy. It’s principle is best described by ‘Team Sky’ and their ‘marginal gains‘ philosophy.

2 learn continuously hire for willWill over knowledge

When hiring managers review candidates, will (aka enthusiasm, passion and a want to succeed) is often as important (if not more so) than existing knowledge and skill.


Build trust

3 build trust with video testimonialsBuild consumer confidence

Customer confidence is key. Without it, you won’t get them to contribute to your business. Word-of-mouth is a powerful marketing tool, so use video reviews to build trust.

3 build trust with colleague testimonialsGather colleague testimonials

LinkedIn is a fantastic resource to authentically aggregate reviews from fellow colleagues, peers and mentors. They’re the customer reviews of the recruitment world.


Manage your mistakes

4 manage mistakes pr crisisCrisis management

S**t happens, fact. It’s  how a business handles their mistakes that sticks in the minds of consumers, not the mistake itself. Just take KFC’s response to running out of chicken.

4 manage mistakes opportunity to learnConsider failure an opportunity

Don’t fear failure. At some point in your career, it’s going to happen. Take it as an opportunity to learn, find the positives and develop so you’re better-prepared next time.


Embrace bad experiences

5 embrace bad experiences marketing shapes and sizesSome marketing isn’t for you

Marketing varies from company to company. If you’re in a company whose marketing is a bit pants, embrace it by learning how you’d do it better in your next role.

5 embrace bad experiences dont learn behaviourDon’t inherit bad behaviour

Some colleagues’ behaviours can be, well, questionable. Learn how not to behave from these guys. I’ve built my management style as much on how not to behave as how to.


Market your ‘why’

6 market your why company sells solutionsSimon Sinek’s Golden Circle

For those of you who’ve not heard Simon Sinek’s ‘Start with Why’ TED talk, stop now, go watch, then continue. Sell your companies beliefs, values and mission.

6 market your why find aligned companyShare your beliefs

Early on in your career, don’t be afraid to job-hop. It’s (almost) expected of recent graduates. Take the time to find a company that shares your life mission and beliefs.


Know your competition

7 competition anne summersChocolate gifts and lingerie

Valentine’s Day 2014. A lingerie company started running ads for ‘chocolate gifts’ searches. They knew their competition was greater than simply other lingerine companies.

7 competition behave for next roleBehave for the role you want

The hard truth is that if you want to progress up the career ladder, you need to behave and perform as if you’re in that role before you’re given the job.


Know your customers

8 know customers persona marketingMarket to people

Guess what, you market to real people. So create personas for your key audience groups, give them names, back stories and most importantly understand their needs.

8 know customers stakeholdersYour boss has a persona

Applying persona marketing to key stakeholders in your company is a good idea, too. When you understand your bosses needs, you understand how to best support them.


Appriciate subjectivity

9 appriciate subjectivity data drivenData as a decision maker

Every man and his dog will have an opinion on something, but it’s often best to let the data do the talking. Opinions are valid, but only if the data backs them up.

9 appriciate subjectivity understand judgeInto their shoes

All too often I hear colleagues making judgment on a person, campaign or other business decision with limited or partial knowledge or understanding of the situation.


Respect leadership

10 respect leadership hard to innovateApple get a hard time

Being at the forefront of innovation isn’t easy. Staying there for a prolonged period of time is even harder. It takes hard work, time, money, effort and a best-in-class team.

10 respect leadership journey is rewardDon’t walk before you can run

Be realistic with your career aspirations. Don’t expect to have a managerial role and £100k a year after 5 years. Take your time and build your skills. The journey is the reward.

 

 

John Alexander Rowley

An enthusiastic digital marketing professional passionately dedicated to increasing the online presence of businesses and individuals in order to improve engagement and ROI.

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